Anise Fabric Fiesta

I dragged out some of my fabric stash for evaluation. There were some surprises, like the three small holes I found in my salt and pepper wool ;( And a AHA moment about a selection that was headed back to Fabric.comland (more on that one, later).

Colette Anise

For Anise I was initially trying to decide between these two.

An 80/20 Wool/Cashmere Melton Suiting.

In black, or midnight as it was advertised.

80/20 Wool/Cashmere~ Black

80/20 Wool/Cashmere~ Black

It is DIVINELY soft, but not quite coat weight (obvs. as I just said that it’s suiting). I do have a ton of black flannel that I could use to underline it. This choice has some definite

Pros:

  • the fabric is quite stable
  • meaning there will be no sliding around while cutting or shifting when sewing
  • the suiting weight might be easier for a first-timer to work bound buttonholes and other tailoring details in.

Cons:

  • I don’t want to do a lot of work for a coat that is not really warm
  • this black seems like it will pick up lots of lint
  • 4 children + lackadaisical housekeeping skills = high lint encounter odds

100% Wool Coating

 In a really pretty (and hard to capture) sort of heathered blue with a diagonal pattern.

Wool Coating! Marled/Heathered Blue

Wool Coating! Marled/Heathered Blue

Wool Coating! Marled/Heathered Blue

The obvious pros are:

  • warmth, warmth, warmth. I get sooooo cold in the winter. A brisk fall day makes me pull out a scarf.
  • due to the warmth factor, I could wear it longer

Cons:

  • the weave on this is slightly loose
  • which makes it a prime candidate for unraveling and other shenanigans while working with it
  • that pretty diagonal pattern will also make any misalignment of pieces really obvious

This last one is a wildcard option. I bought it with pants in mind, but I have absolutely nowhere to wear snazzy wool pants too….skirts I can justify more easily. Anyway, I like it and I think it could make a smart little jacket.

100% Wool Herringbone/Squares Suiting

Plaid Wool~ Charcoal Grey and Burgundy

Plaid Wool~ Charcoal Grey and Burgundy

Plaid Wool~ Charcoal Grey and Burgundy

Same Pros:

  • the fabric is quite stable
  • meaning there will be no sliding around while cutting or shifting when sewing
  • the suiting weight might be easier for a first-timer to work bound buttonholes and other tailoring details in
  • plus, the squares will likely make aligning pattern pieces much easier

Cons:

  • I don’t want to do a lot of work for a coat that is not really warm
  • I have a black herringbone coat from H&M that I don’t wear so often, but it’s not warm so I think it’s that more than the fabric that keeps it in the closet
  • lining up those red squares might be a bitch and a half

Lining

This is the only suitable lining material I have on hand. I like it. A lot, actually. It would look great with that black fabric, but it’s not the nicest lining ever by any means.

Bow Print Poly~ Baby Pink

Bow Print Poly~ Baby Pink

Could I use the delicious Black Poly Crepe de Chine? This might be a better use for it than a dress.

Crepe de Chine~ Black

Would that be entirely too much black? Would it contrast too much, in a bad way with the blue coating? It might look really nice with the herringbone fabric….The ladies at Coletterie caution that a poly lining might be, too warm.

Any opinions?? Coletterie staff, feel free to chime in if you’re reading this ;o)

19 thoughts on “Anise Fabric Fiesta

  1. It seems we are in the same boat here! Everything that I think would be cute is too thin and everything that is the perfect weight I feel very meh about. I love the bow lining and would probably pick option 2 because as you said it doesn’t make much sense putting in all that work into a jacket that you wont be able to wear until spring….unless your ok with that :)

    • That’s the choice I’m leaning towards. Because, honestly, that fabric has been sitting in my closet for over a year. If I mess it up, no big deal. Right??

      And if I don’t then I’ll have an awesome jacket!

  2. I vote for the wool coating. Like you, I wouldn’t want to put in the time for something that really wasn’t warm when I just love being warm! The blue would look fantastic and I think you could make the the pattern in the fabric shine as the Anise.

  3. Bow lining, but I’d totally be all for underlining the cashmere with some flannel for warmth factor. Since I’ve got two kids, two grown up kids, four adult cats and six kittens (wan’t one????) I know how lint/hair/lackadaisical house keeping works and well, it never stopped me.

    But the second option sounds awesome too AND I like the bows with either.

    • AHAHAHAHA you ALWAYS make me laugh! We’d have a cat in the mix if my husband wasn’t dead set against it. We could probably sad, puppy face him into it, but the first time some fabric was attacked I’d be ready to give ‘em then boot ;p

  4. If you don’t think it’ll be warm enough, I wouldn’t cut into it. You could always save the wool suiting for something else. And there’s no such thing as too much black!

  5. I vote for #2 with the pretty bow lining and you know there is a place in the garment district that will fuse interfacing to the fabric for you rather inexpensively. I think the actual name is on the Shop the Garment District blog. It will help with making the fabric and jacket warmer. I’ll be following along because this is will be a great jacket.

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